What is hypnotherapy and how can it help you?

Hypnosis is a naturally occurring state of relaxation and heightened awareness into which we enter many times each day, for example while absorbed in a task, daydreaming, reading a book or driving ‘on autopilot’. During this hypnotic state, both blood pressure and heart rate are lowered, brain wave patterns are altered, and people become highly responsive to positive suggestion. The relaxation alone produced by hypnosis, when done regularly, can improve immune system function, combat fatigue, and aid memory and learning. In fact, hypnosis has been used effectively for over two hundred years to treat a wide range of physical, emotional and behavioural issues.

Hypnotherapy treatment involves the induction of this hypnotic state in order to allow direct communication with the subconscious mind, which stores emotions, memories, internalised beliefs and is often programmed with unhealthy, inappropriate or limiting behaviour patterns. All too often, diet plans, willpower and conscious decisions to change do not produce lasting results because the subconscious mind is still holding on to these old patterns and beliefs. Lasting change requires the re-programming of the subconscious mind. When the client is in hypnosis, it is possible to bypass the critical faculty of the analytical conscious mind and directly influence the subconscious mind to make fundamental changes and access resources that may have been forgotten, producing positive and permanent changes, often in a dramatic way.

What is a session like?

A typical hypnotherapy session involves guided relaxation into hypnosis followed by positive suggestions or story-telling and metaphor, from which the highly suggestible subconscious mind picks up meaning and learns to apply new responses. Issues that may be deeply rooted in the client’s past may be addressed through careful regression and analysis.

The client is in complete control, however, because the conscious mind is always present, and can choose to open their eyes and end the trance at any time they wish. Furthermore, it is impossible to ‘get stuck in hypnosis’; in the naturally-occurring state, people either come out of the trance when something demands their conscious attention, or the relaxation deepens until they fall asleep. In a clinically-induced trance, the hypnotherapist will count the client gradually out of the trance so that he or she emerges feeling refreshed, alert and ready to get on with the rest of the day.

Positive change is usually apparent after the first session and, unlike many other ‘talk’ therapies, hypnotherapy can produce lasting results in a short space of time.

Virtually anyone can be hypnotised and benefit from hypnotherapy. Despite popular myth, being able to go into trance is not linked to gullibility or low intelligence. On the contrary, people with high levels of intelligence, imagination and an open mind usually make the best candidates for hypnosis. Key factors, however, are positive expectations that change can occur and motivation to make those changes.

Hypnotherapy is recognised by the British Medical Association, the British Psychological Society and the American Medical Association and the US National Institute of Health.

Hypnosis is a naturally occurring state of relaxation and heightened awareness into which we enter many times each day, for example while absorbed in a task, daydreaming, reading a book or driving ‘on autopilot’. During this hypnotic state, both blood pressure and heart rate are lowered, brain wave patterns are altered, and people become highly responsive to positive suggestion. The relaxation alone produced by hypnosis, when done regularly, can improve immune system function, combat fatigue, and aid memory and learning. In fact, hypnosis has been used effectively for over two hundred years to treat a wide range of physical, emotional and behavioural issues.

Hypnotherapy treatment involves the induction of this hypnotic state in order to allow direct communication with the subconscious mind, which stores emotions, memories, internalised beliefs and is often programmed with unhealthy, inappropriate or limiting behaviour patterns. All too often, diet plans, willpower and conscious decisions to change do not produce lasting results because the subconscious mind is still holding on to these old patterns and beliefs. Lasting change requires the re-programming of the subconscious mind. When the client is in hypnosis, it is possible to bypass the critical faculty of the analytical conscious mind and directly influence the subconscious mind to make fundamental changes and access resources that may have been forgotten, producing positive and permanent changes, often in a dramatic way.